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8 Things Healthy People Do Every Single Day

Dietitians and trainers not only help other people live their~best lives~, but they’re pretty good about incorporating healthy habits into their daily lives, too. And their top-tips below are all pretty doable, proving that living well doesn’t have to mean overhauling your entire life. Because when it comes to living healthy, it’s not all about chugging a kale smoothie, sweating it out in 90-minute hot yoga sessions, or picking up fresh flowers from the farmer’s market.

Healthy living means different things to different people, but there are some simple habits that can help you lead a more balanced, energized life every single day—no matter what your goals are. So put these expert-approved tips in your green juice and sip it:

1. Drink water like you mean it.

H20 is pretty much your BFF. “Every morning, I pour myself a big glass of water, which I drink before putting anything else in my body,” explains Nora Minno, R.D., C.D.N. “Staying hydrated keeps our bodies healthy down to the cellular level and it also helps keep us from overeating. Oftentimes we can mistake thirst for hunger,” she adds, which can lead to taking in more calories than your body needs from food.

Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, also swears by staying hydrated. “I never leave home without my water bottle,” she says. “My goal is to drink at least three bottles full each day. Dehydration can lead to feelings of hunger, headaches, and lack of energy, so having it with me at all times makes it easy to stay hydrated.”

2. Enjoy your meals and try to eat without any distractions.

Mindful eating is one of those things that’s easier said than done—but worth working on. “While I can’t always escape eating a meal in front of my computer, I try to take at least 10 to 15 minutes to enjoy my meal [distraction-free],” says Rumsey. “No phone, no TV—just me and my food. This enables me to really taste and appreciate my food. Most importantly, I’m able to pay attention to my satiety cues, and stop eating when I am hungry.” Read More